Hi, I’m Christine Davies. Thank you for visiting our website and your interest in Fieldcrest. My husband Paul and I have lived here since 2004, and have tried to create a garden that is pleasant to look out on and spend time in, but which also attracts wildlife and allows us to grow some of our own fruit, vegetables, herbs and flowers.

Set in 1.3 acres of countryside at the heart of the Wirral Peninsula, Fieldcrest boasts an established cottage garden and presents a varied programme of events and activities throughout the year.

The house is set in about one and a third acres of flat, south facing land. We have divided the garden into a number of separate areas, each with its own character.

Garden Map

Front Garden

This area is mostly planted with a variety of shrubs, to be as low maintenance as possible. Many are evergreen to provide interest throughout the year. There is lots of ground cover for wildlife. I have planted more ferns, hostas and spring bulbs into the beds in the last few years. Click to see pictures of the Front Garden…

The Yew Walk

This walkway has a formal design, with upright Junipers and Thuja spheres in the centre, backed by a Yew hedge (still growing). It is mainly planted with perennials and roses plus some shrubs such as Spiraea and Philadelphus.I have started to grow Clematis through the shrubs to provide some summer colour. It was designed to be a crimson, pink and white border but some blue has crept in as well! Click to see pictures of the Yew Walk…

Bold Woodland

We had to replace the original herb garden with some trees a few years ago. We decided not to have a traditional woodland area, and are in the process of creating a ‘bold’ planting area, using plants such as Ligularia and Rodgersia which have large interesting leaves. It has been planted with an orange, red and yellow theme. Click to see pictures of the Bold Woodland…

Back Garden

As we look out onto this area from the house, we try to have interest throughout the year. We lost a lot of shrubs and trees in the winter of 2011, so we have been replanting in 2012. As you move away from the house the planting becomes less formal, and links in with the wild garden and the orchard area. Click to see pictures of the Back Garden…

Bird and Butterfly Border

This area has been planted to provide food for butterflies and other beneficial insects, together with many berrying trees and shrubs for autumn and winter food for birds. Click to see pictures of the Bird and Butterfly Border…

Fruit Trees and Grasses

This area is planted with a small selection of fruit trees. We let the grass grow longer here, with many bulbs naturalising in the spring. This year some beds have been sown with ‘pictorial meadow flowers’ similar to those planted for the Olympics – lets hope ours perform! Click to see pictures of the Fruit Trees and Grasses…

Country Lane

This narrow strip near the boundary to the garden used to be an access route to the next field. We decided to make a feature out of it, and have been planting a variety of native trees, bushes and perennials to create the feel of a country lane – without the speeding traffic! Click to see pictures of the Country Lane…

Kitchen Garden (Potager)

So called because it combines the cultivation of fruit, vegetables, herbs and flowers. We have put a lot of raised beds in this area as we generally adopt a ‘no dig’ policy. There is a ‘chocolate border’ consisting of chocolate scented or named ‘chocolate’ plants. Some are actually edible, but unfortunately are not a replacement for real chocolate! Click to see pictures of the Kitchen Garden…

Wild Areas

We try to be as environmentally friendly as possible throughout the garden. We have areas of uncultivated grass, log piles and stones around as shelter for wildlife. We have been awarded Cheshire Wildlife Trust’s Gold Award. Click to see pictures of the Wood and Wildlife Areas…